Two-Hour Custom Molded Prosthetic

Two-Hour Custom Molded Prosthetic

Two Hour Custom Molded Prosthetic

80% of amputees worldwide go without modern prosthesis.

The entire process of being fitted for a prosthetic and the creation of that prosthetic can take anywhere from two weeks to a few months to complete. It requires multiple appointments and a large sum of funds to get through the process. For individuals with  low incomes, a prosthetic are not always an option because of the financial hurdle associated with receiving them.

In an attempt to decrease not only the creation time, but the financial aspect as well, German startup AMPARO has created an alternative to the traditional process of being fitted for prosthetics. This process drastically simplifies the custom fitting aspect of the prosthetic. The process also lowers the price tag associated with traditional processes, which makes this product more accessible to the other 80% of amputees who cannot afford modern prosthetics. The entire process can be completed in as little as just two hours! AMPARO’s prosthetic was one of three winners at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Innovation Showcase in June 2015.

AMPARO’s focus in prosthetics revolves around the socket. The socket is the interface between a prosthetic device and the amputee’s limb. This is the most expensive portion of any prosthetic because it has to be custom fit to the amputee’s limb. AMPARO hopes to make substantial improvements in this area because while there has been research done with other areas of the prosthetic, sockets are sorely underdeveloped in their technology. Right now, the process AMPARO uses for fitting the socket is akin to the molding used for dental mouth guards. The material can be heated and then an imprint of the area can be taken. From this, the socket can be quickly created and produced for the individual in need. This technique not only cuts down the time frame for creating the prosthetic, but the overall cost as well.

http://news.psu.edu/story/390530/2016/02/02/graduate-student-works-make-prosthetics-accessible-developing-countries